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Iranian Food

Visits to Iran result in a striking variety of flavors. Among the familiar kebabs and certainly the grilled lamb testies, there is a wide variety of foods: caviar, pickles and smoked fish; samosas, falafel and hot and sour shrimp in the south; noodles, wholegrain and rosewater-scented ice cream.Take a look at the location of Iran on the map and it is easy to understand why the coverage of natural foods is so wide. Iran, which was once the center of the Iranian Empire, neighbors the countries of the former Soviet Union as well as Afghanistan, Pakistan, the Arab states and Turkey. Despite being part of the Middle East, Iran has close ties with Europe, the Far East and Africa thanks to its central location on the Silk Road trade route.
 
 

Moreover, Alexander the Great, the former warrior of Greece, conquered the Persian Empire in the 4th century and was later invaded by Arabs, Turks, Mongols and Uzbeks. While the Iranians already have an advanced food identity before this invasion, they have assimilated what foreigners bring. Consider the Russian method borscht found in beans, herbs and cumin, cucumber and Chinese noodles in the soup of sour fermented pestle water.

 Many coveted content such as pistachio, almond, walnut, saffron, mint, orange, pomegranate and grape are unique to Iran. Iran has a variable climate with four different seasons, and contrary to other parts of the Middle East where dry land restricts which nutrients can be grown, the old Persians are transformed into
fertile waters of arid land with underground aquifers attracting molten snow water. A kitchen full of bright, emotional, fruit-and-plants was born.
 
 
 Fesenjan (Pomegranate Stew)
 
This iconic stew is an important part of every Persian wedding menu, pomegranate with chicken or duck mating. Round walnut, pomegranate salad and onion are boiled slowly and thick sauce is made. Sometimes saffron and cinnamon are added and may be a pinch of sugar to balance the acid. Fesenjan has a long family tree. Archaeologists have found stone tablets written in the remains of Persepolis, the ancient ritual capital of the Persian Empire, back to 515, listing the early Iranian goblet staples. The main contents of Fesenjan included walnuts, poultry and pomegranate preserves.
 
 
 Bademjan (Eggplant and Tomato Sauce)
 
This stew is a worthwhile feature that shows that tomatoes are cooked with glittering red-gold color on turmeric, an oil gloss on them, and cooked long enough to raise oils in Moroccan dishes. A little tartar, tomato juice, lemon juice and sometimes juicy grapes are checked by the aubergine which is fried as golden brown, then cooked with onion, lamb and lamb. tomatoes and spices. Like all Iranian beans, the badminton is thick and it means that the fork must be eaten over the rice.
 
 
 
Baghali Polo (Rice with Dill and Fava Beans)
 
In Iranian dishes, rice butter and saffron can be prepared as chelo only. But, as is often the case, it is cooked with other ingredients and is called polo. Polo can be prepared with herbs, vegetables, beans, nuts, dried fruit, meat and even noodles, and is located in the center of the dishes. This polo fava bean is young and tender and very good in the spring in the dill season. The dish is flecked with green dill and favored and is often cooked with very tender lamb pieces. Alternatively, the bone can be served with lamb. Pirincin must be soft saffron flavored with saffron mixed into the rice before serving.
 
 
 
 Zereshk Polo (Blueberry Rice) 
 
The Iranians love sour tastes. Like cranberries, barberries have a vibrant red color, but they are even more sour. This classic brass bowl is covered with red fruit that has been dried before being cooked and then re-boiled with water. Rice is cooked in large quantities, which helps to soften the intensity of the strawberry. Quince, rhubarb, green plum, sour orange, lemon, lemon, dried lime, sour cherry, tamarind, sumac and pomegranate are used to make the food more delicious.
 
 
 
 
 
 Gormeh Sabzi (Green Herb Stew) 
 
Herbs, beans and lamb, made from deep green gormeh patty satisfy two Persian flavor obsessions: sour and full of herbs. Casserole lemon omani dry limes, experienced with Persian. This lime is extra heavy and sour, adds a unique flavor to the taste with bitter taste. The other patience in Gormeh sabzi is that most gypsy leaves are foreign to many Westerners. Other herbs include parsley, coriander and sardines.
 
 
 Ash-e-Reshteh (Noodle and Bean Soup)
 
Noodle, beans, herbs and a leafy green soup with spinach and beetroot leaves. Inside are mint oil, crispy onion and sour wasabi, which looks like sour yogurt.