en +98.912.397.8677 info@dumantour.com +98.935.998.1117

Login

Sign Up

After creating an account, you'll be able to track your payment status, track the confirmation and you can also rate the tour after you finished the tour.
Username*
Password*
Confirm Password*
First Name*
Last Name*
Email*
Phone*
Country*
* Creating an account means you're okay with our Terms of Service and Privacy Statement.

Already a member?

Login
en +98.912.397.8677 info@dumantour.com +98.935.998.1117

Login

Sign Up

After creating an account, you'll be able to track your payment status, track the confirmation and you can also rate the tour after you finished the tour.
Username*
Password*
Confirm Password*
First Name*
Last Name*
Email*
Phone*
Country*
* Creating an account means you're okay with our Terms of Service and Privacy Statement.

Already a member?

Login

Tehran

TEHRAN Tours

Tehran is the capital of Iran, It located in the north of the country. Its central Golestan Palace complex, with its ornate rooms and marble throne which was the seat of power in the Qajar dynasty. The National Jewelry Museum holds many monarchs’ jewels for Qajar, while the National Museum of Iran has artifacts dating back to Paleolithic times. The Milad Tower offers panoramic views over the city.Tehran is a cosmopolitan city, with great museums, parks, restaurants, and warm friendly people.Tehran can be roughly divided into two different parts – north and south. The northern districts of Tehran are more prosperous, modern, cosmopolitan and expensive while southern parts are less attractive but cheaper.

The freedom tower and Azadi Square

The symbol of Tehran was built in 1971 as Iran’s gateway to Western civilization, consisting of eight thousand white marble blocks (Freedom Tower). The fifty-meter high tower, a fusion of Islamic and Sassian architectural styles, reminds us of the formation of the Persian Empire and is an interesting combination of both modern and ancient cultures. The tower is part of the Azadi cultural complex, consisting of museums and fountains, in the 50,000 square meter Azadi square of Tehran. From the north side rises to the north of the city in the mountain range of Elburz (Alborz). 

National Garden

It is the remaining of the structure from the Qajar dynasty that was repaired by the Jafar khan Kashani. In that time Tehran was capital.before the Azadi tower it was the symbol of Tehran in old days.the architecture of this monument is mixed Iranian and European design by that time!   And it was the entrance of the military square in old day but now it is the entrance of Iran national library and museum and the remaining of the old structure. Portal has a great crossing between two pillars of the parties. The exterior includes tiling designs with two lions, leopard, lion and sun, guns and cannonballs that be seen. All three doors have iron gates that was built by Mohammad Ali Kermani in the Tehran armory

Tehran National & Islamic Period Museums

Bldg. No 1 has the entire pre-Islamic remaining works, Bldg. No.2 has post-Islamic works. This part was inaugurated at 1996 and consists of 3 floors. The first floor is the meeting and temporary exhibition hall. Works and objects of Islamic culture, Islam art in relation to objective and periodic method are collected in the second and third floors.The objects selected for this large museum, are mostly selected out of excavation or from prominent collections. 

In designing this museum, instruments related to architecture of historical buildings are presented, at the same time, to explain their actual position.

Golestan Palace

The lavish Golestan Palace is a masterpiece of the Qajar era, embodying the successful integration of earlier Persian crafts and architecture with Western influences. The walled Palace, one of the oldest groups of buildings in Teheran, became the seat of government of the Qajar family, which came into power in 1779 and made Teheran the capital of the country. Built around a garden featuring pools as well as planted areas, the Palace’s most characteristic features and rich ornaments date from the 19th century. It became a centre of Qajari arts and architecture of which it is an outstanding example and has remained a source of inspiration for Iranian artists and architects to this day. It represents a new style incorporatingtraditional Persian arts and crafts and elements of 18th century architecture and technology

Takht-e-Marmar

The spectacular terrace known as Takht-e-Marmar (Marble Throne) was built in 1806 by order of Fath Ali Shah Qajar (r. 1797-1834).  Adorned by paintings, marble-carvings, tile-work, stucco, mirrors, enamel, woodcarvings, and lattice windows; the throne embodies the finest of Iranian architecture. The Marble Throne is one of the oldest buildings of the historic Arg.  The existing throne, which is situated in the middle of the terrace (iwan), is made of the famous yellow marble of Yazd province.The throne is made of sixty-five pieces of marble and was designed by Mirza Baba Naghash Bashi (head painter) of the Qajar court.  Mohammad Ebrahim, the Royal Mason, oversaw the construction and several celebrated masters of the time worked on the execution of this masterpiece.  The architectural details and other ornaments of the terrace (iwan) were completed during the reigns of Fath Ali Shah and Nasser – ol- Din Shah (r. 1848-1896).Coronations of Qajar kings, and formal court ceremonies were held on this terrace (iwan). The last coronation to be held at Takht-e-Marmar was the coronation of, the self-proclaimed King, Reza Khan Pahlavi in 1925.Shams-ol-Emaneh (Edifice of the Sun) is the most stunning structures of the Golestan Palace.The idea of building a tall structure came to Nasser-ol-Din Shah before his first European and from pictorial images of European buildings.  The Monarch wanted a structure from which he could have panoramic views of the city.esigned by  Moayer-ol-Mamalek, construction on the Shams-ol-Emareh began in 1865 and was completed two years later. The architect was Master Ali Mohammad Kashi.

 The building has two identical towers.  The exterior views have multiple arches, intricate tile work and ornate windows.  This building is a fusion of Persian and European architecture

Talar-e-Ayeneh (The Hall of Mirror)

is the most famous of the Palace hall. This relatively small hal is famous for its extraordinary mirror work. The Hall was designed by Haj Abdoul Hossein Memar bashi (Sanie-ol-Molk). Yahaya Khan Moetamed-ol-Molk,the Minister of Architecture, acted as consultant to the designerThe Ottoman king, Sultan Abdoulhamid, send precious gifts to Nasser-ol-Din Shah.  Reportedly, these gifts were copious and enough to fill a castle.  The Qajar monarch was delighted with these gifts.  He decided to build an exhibit hall worthy of these gifts within the confines of Golestan Palace.  It is believed that Nasser-ol-Din Shah, himself, designed the structure, with a central hall large enough to house the carpet that was sent by Sultan Abdoulhamid. Completed in 1883, the Abyaze (White) Palace now houses one of the most interesting ethological museums in Iran.  There is a colorful exhibition of tradition Iranian costumes, as well as a folk art exhibition

Khalvat-e-Karim Khani

Dating back to 1759, this building was a part of the interior residence of Karim Khan Zand.  The basic structure of the Khalvat-e-Karim Khani is similar to Takht-e-Marmar. Like the latter, it is a terrace (iwan). There is a small marble throne inside the terrace. The structure is much smaller than Takht-e-Marmar and it has much less ornamentation. There was once a small pond with a fountain in the middle of this terrace.  Water from a subterranean stream (the king’s qanat) flowed from the fountain into the pond and was later used to irrigate the Palace grounds.Nasser-ol-Din Shah was fond of this corner of Golestan Palace.  He is said to have spent much time here in rest and repose– smoking his water pipe in quite reflection.  In fact, some believe that it was he who dubbed the structure Khalvat (a cozy corner).  It seems extraordinary, but the valuable gravestone of Nasser-ol-Din Shah finally found its way to this quite corner of the Palace after being misplaced for sometime.  This marble stone with a craved image of Nasser-ol-Din Shah is indeed a site to behold.

Shams-ol-Emaneh (Edifice of the Sun

Shams al-Imarat (Shams-ol Emareh, or Sun Building)This building is the most outstanding one in Golestan Palace and the finest on its eastern wing. Before his trip to Europe, Nassereddin Shah (that inspired by the pictures, he had seen of European Buildings) decided to construct a European Style Building in his Capital, so he could watch city’s panoramic view from its balcony.

Wind Tower Building (Imarat-i Badgir)

Wind Tower Building sits on the southern wing of Golestan Garden. Built during the reign of Fath Ali Shah, it was dramatically modified at the time of Nassereddin Shah. Under the hall there is a large summer chamber. Each corner bears a tall wind tower covered with blue, yellow and black glazed tiles and a golden cupola. Wind coming through these towers cools the summer chamber, hall and rooms.

NATIONAL JEWELRY MUSEUM

About Treasury of National Jewels

The incomparable “Treasury of the National Jewels”, which is open to public, is a collection of the most expensive jewels of the world, collected over centuries.Every piece of this collection is a reflection of the tumultuous history of this great nation, and artistry of the residents of this land. Each piece recalls memories of bitter-sweet victories and defeats, of the pride and arrogance of rulers who were powerful or weak.Dear visitors, who may come to see the excellent work and the gems of this unique collection, before you are overwhelmed by its glitter, consider the historic reasons for collection these jewels. Recognize the judgment of history, and with a clear awareness, think why the jewels were collected and what purpose they served.

This Treasury, on one hand, depicts the culture and civilization of the Iranian people who have had an adventurous past, and on the other hand, repeats the silent tears of oppressed people who worked hard and instead the rulers, could show off their arrogance and power with their gold and jewels.Our intention in presenting these jewels is to get you more acquainted with the rich culture and civilization of Iran. And to learn from history the fate of those who pursue power and hoard wealth. For this end we present this rich collection, which we have inherited and hope to preserve and pass on richer to our inheritors.The value of the objects in the Treasury of National Jewels is not limited to their economic value, but is also a reflection of the creativity and taste of Iranian craftsmen and artist over the different eras of history, and represents the artistic and cultural heritage of the vast country on Iran.

These jewels and rarities were decorations for the rulers during the past eras, and often showed the glory and extravagance of the courts, as well as their power and wealth.

Tabiat Bridge

Tabiat Pedestrian Bridge is located in the northern part of Tehran in a zone which called Abbas Abad Lands; this is a 559Ha area which is mainly dedicated to cultural spaces such as libraries and museums, as well as public parks. This bridge was designed in order to address the need to improve access for pedestrians between the two parks, which are divided by major highways.  ‘Tabiat’ means ‘Nature’ in Persian language.

The bridge crosses Modarres Highway, one of the main highways of the city, and connects Abo Atash Park on the west to Taleghani Park on the east. The intention was to design a pedestrian route that was completely separate from the highway. The 270 meters long bridge is the largest pedestrian bridge built so far in Iran.

Design of this bridge was the result of a two-phase competition which started in May 2008. The winning design was selected in August of the following year, with detailed structural and architectural design beginning in September 2009 and construction work began in September 2010. It was inaugurated in October 2014.

Carpet

It’s beautiful  and out standing Iranian architechar facade resembling carpet woven  looms was built 1976 with 3400m square Iranian woven ,pile woven rug and carpet ,difference in size , any things bigger than 2by3squre meter called carpet or gali , smaller sizes are called rug (galicheh).

Milad Tower

Tehran’s Milad Tower is a multi-purpose skyscraper located in northwestern Tehran. Milad Tower is the tallest tower in Iran and the sixth tallest telecommunication tower in the world. The head structure of this tower, which has an area of 12000 square meters, is the largest among all towers in the world in terms of area in use.The general form of the body consists of a central octagon with some interior walls and four trapezoidal wings connected to it.In terms of the structure design, calculations and results based on the model of a wind tunnel, the tower has been designed for air flows as fast as 140 km/h and momentary gusts as fast as 220 km/h. This design also preserves the tower against earthquake, because the effects of wind force are 40 percent less than those of earthquake force. Taking into account these facts, four levels of earthquake have been considered in designing the Tower, which, in the second level, with a return period of 110 years, the building will be completely safe and no damage would occur. In the fourth level, i.e. a very severe earthquake that is likely to occur every 100 years in Tehran, the structure would maintain its stability.

Niavaran Palace Complex

Niavaran Palace Complex is situated in the northern part of Tehran, Iran in 9000 square meters area. It consists of several buildings and a museum. The Sahebqaraniyeh Palace from the time of Nasir al-Din Shah of Qajar dynasty is also inside this complex. The main Niavaran Palace, completed in 1968, was the primary residence of the last Shah, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi and the Imperial family until the Iranian Revolution. The main palace was designed in 1337 AH (1958) by the Iranian architect Mohsen Foroughi, and following a short delay in its construction, it was completed in 1346 AH (1967) and used in 1347 AH (1968).

Presently, it is comprised of five museums (Niavaran Palace Museum, Ahmad Shahi Pavilion, Sahebqaraniyeh Palace, Jahan Nama museum and the private library), and other cultural, historical and natural attractions including the Blue Hall, Private Cinema, Jahan Nama Gallery, and Niavaran Garden.

The Niavarān Palace Complex traces its origin to a garden in Niavaran, Tehran that was used by Nasir al-Din Shah as a summer residence. The palace erected by Nasir al-Din Shah in this garden was originally referred to as The Niavarān Palace and was later renamed The Sahebqaraniyeh Palace. During the reign of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi all the peripheral buildings of The Sahebqraniyeh Palace, with the exception of The Ahmad-Shahi Pavilion (or Kushk-e Ahmad-Shahi), were demolished and the buildings and the structures of the present-day Niavarān Palace Complex were built to the north of The Sahebqaraniyeh Palace. In this period, The Ahmad-Shahi Pavilion served as an exhibition area of the presents of the world leaders to Iran.

The quadrilateral design of the palace and its interior archeological designing is inspired by Iranian archeology while making use of modern technology. Its decorations have also been inspired by the pre and post Islamic art. The gypsum work has been carried out by Master Abdollahi, the mirror work by Master Ali Asghar, the tile work of the outer part by Master Ibrahim Kazempour and Ilia. The building floor is covered by black stone and has an aluminum sliding roof. The internal decoration and furniture of the palace have been designed and implemented by a French group. In the ground floor of this building there is a great hall in which all the rooms are situated, including a private cinema, dining room, guest room, waiting room and lateral halls as well as the Blue Hall.

 The half floor of this building, the office, conference room, Farah Diba’s secretary’s room, Leila’s bedroom and her retainer’s room. In the stairways there is a room where Mohammad-Reza’s military uniforms and official suits and his medals are kept.

 The third floor, Pahlavi’s resting place and his children’s and their retainer’s rooms are situated. These places are all decorated with precious paintings, carpets and gifts received from different countries

Sa’ad Abad Palace Complex

With an area of more than 110 hectares, there lays Sa’ad Abad complex at the foot of the Alborz ranges, north of Tehran, situated to the west of Golab Dareh and east of Velenjak quarters.It was first the summer residence of Qajar kings, and then turned into Reza Shah’s summer residence following expansion and annexation of some other quarters.

Green Palace Museum

Shahvand Palace, Which is now called Green Palace is one of the most beautiful Palaces…

Shahvand Palace which is now called Green Palace is one of the most beautiful palaces in Iran. This palace is located in a higher ground in the north west of SaadAbad. Formerly this building belonged to someone called “AliKhan” who was one of the big land owners and later it was bought by Reza Shah. During 1923-1929 Reza Shah renovated and redecorated this building by an architect called” Mirza Jafar Memar Bashi”. The outside view is covered by rare pearl green stones from Zanjan province hence it was called Green Palace. This palace is a two story building in an area of 1203 square meters.The most interesting part of this palace is the mirror hall with a made to measure carpet of seventy square meters, woven in the famouse Amoughli carpet workshop in Mashhad.

Mellat Palace Museum (White Palace)

White Palace is the largest mansion in this collection. In addition to ceremonial and official

White Palace is the largest mansion in this complex. In addition to ceremonial and official affairs this building was used as a summer residence of Mohammad Reza Shah (the second king of Pahlavi dynasty) and the queen Farah.The first king of Pahlavi, Reza Shah ordered to build this palace in 1932 which was completed by 1937. But it was effectively used three years later. Many artists and engineers were involved in building this palace. Layout plan was designed by Mr Khorsandi and engineering drawings were developed by Leon Taavosian, Pesyan and Russian Boris.  This palace is built in surrounding area of 2164 square meters; it is a two story building and a basement with a total of 5000 square meters area.This building has 54 units including ten large ceremonial saloons which were the official reception hall of Mohammad Reza Pahlavi.he largest room in this building is 220 square meters that was used as the dining room.

TEHRAN BAZAARS: TAJRISH BAZAAR VS. TEHRAN GRAND BAZAAR

Tehran bazaar | Iranian Bazaars, usually have very old structures and architecture. They were first formed as a set of shops colonized together in the heart of cities to have better security and also income. Later, they were roofed and changed into the forms we see today in some parts of the world. Bazaars can be seen in almost all of old cities and towns of Iran. Most of them are still in function. For shopping lovers looking for the best products and the best deals and travelers who seek to see the daily life of folks, navigating Tehran, presents some sizable challenges. From food markets, to touristy goods and souvenirs, from bargain antiques, to everyday items, Tehran has a bazaar for all your needs, if you just know where to go. Two of the most important bazaars in Tehran (Tehran bazaar) are the grand bazaar (almost in the south) and the bazaar of Tajrish (almost in the north). You can find quiet different moods and atmosphere in these two places.

The Bazaar of Tabriz

It is one of the oldest bazaars of the Middle East and the largest covered bazaar in the world. It was inscribed as World Heritage Site by UNESCO in July 2010.Tabriz has been a place of cultural exchange since antiquity and its historic bazaar complex is one of the most important commercial centers on the Silk Road. Located in the center of the city of Tabriz, Iran, this spectacular structure consists of several sub-bazaars, such as Amir Bazaar (for gold and jewelry), Mozzafarieh (a carpet bazaar), a shoe bazaar, and many other ones for various goods. The most prosperous time of Tabriz and its bazaar was in 13th century when town became the capital city of Safavid kingdom. The city lost its status as capital in 16th century, but its bazaar has been being important as a commercial and economic center. Although, numerous modern shops and malls have been established nowadays, the bazaar of Tabriz has remained economic heart of both the city and northwestern of Iran. It is worthy of mention that Tabriz bazaar has been being an important political place, and one can point out its importance in the Iranian Constitutional Revolution in the last century and Islamic Revolution in the contemporary time.