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Yazd

yazd Tours

Yazd city in Iran Inscribed on World Heritage List

Yazd the historical city in central Iran has become the country’s 22nd world heritage site after the World Heritage Committee voted in favor of its inscription on Sunday during the committee’s 41st session in Krakow, Poland. Almost 200 hectares of the city’s 2,270-hectare historical texture now boast world heritage status. Yazd is now the only UNESCO-listed Iranian city where people still live. It is also believed to be the world’s largest inhabited adobe city.  Registering the site on the coveted list was a tougher task than Iranian officials had hoped. The ancient city’s dossier was supposed to be considered for inscription last year but was deemed incomplete by UNESCO’s assessors who gave Iran a long list of shortcomings that had to be redressed to improve the city’s chances of inscription on the coveted list

Dolat Abad Garden

Dolat Abad Garden, built around 1750, is a Persian architecture jewel which annually attracts thousands of domestic and foreign tourists visiting Iran. This beautiful garden consists of a pavilion that was built according to the original Iranian architectural style and a large garden and some other buildings.ong pool in the shade of the tall cypress trees leads to the main entrance. On the way to the mansion, there are beautiful grape and pomegranate trees behind those tall trees.The tallest wind tower of the pavilion inside the garden is conceivable from miles away. This traditional air-conditioning system of local houses around the desert in Iran is the essential elements at the residential structures. However, the exaggerated grand size of this wind catcher functioned perfectly well. Actually the Dolat Abad garden is also renowned for having Iran’s tallest badgir (the wind tower), that is standing over 33 meters; though this one was rebuilt after it collapsed in the 1960s

Amir Chakhmaq Complex

Amir Chakhmaq Complex is a well-known structure in Yazd, central Iran. The complex is noted for its symmetrical sunken alcoves. It is a mosque located on a square by the same name. The complex also houses a caravanserai, a tekieh (a place where religious mourning rituals are held), a public bath, a cold water well, and a confectionery

Towers of Silence: The Zoroastrian Sky Burial Tradition

Two hilltop towers overlook the Iranian city in Yazd, their simple cylindrical walls giving no indication of the gruesome scenes that once took place within them. The structures are known as dakhma, or towers of silence. The Zoroastrians of Yazd used these places as open burial pits, placing their deceased relatives in rows so their bodies would be feasted upon by birds of prey. Sky burial—placing a deceased human body in an exposed location so that animals and the elements will hasten its decomposition—has long been a part of Zoroastrian tradition. According to the religion’s beliefs, a body becomes impure at death, when evil spirits, or nasu, arrive to attack the flesh and soul of the deceased. By contaminating the corpse, nasu also threaten the living. Sky burial is considered a clean death because it prevents putrefaction—birds of prey such as vultures can eat a body down to the bones in just a few hours.

The Atashkadeh (fire temple)

The Atashkadeh (fire temple) of Yazd city is located on Kashani Street. The place of Zoroastrians houses Atash Bahram (the victorious fire).The building was built in 1934 under the supervision of Jamshid Amanat on a piece of land donated by the Amanat brothers, and funded by various sources, HistoricalIran reported.  The fire temple is said to be Iran’s only temple housing Atash Bahram. The latter defines the grade of consecrated fire in the temple, more than it does the temple. It involves the gathering of different types of fire gathered from 16 different sources, including lightning, fire from a cremation pyre, fire from trading places where a furnace is maintained and fires from the hearths of houses. 

Each of the 16 fires is subjected to a purification ritual before its merger. Thirty-two priests are required for the consecration ceremony, which can take up to a year to complete.

Masjid-i Jami'-i Yazd

Situated adjacent to the center of the town of Yazd, the complex of the Friday mosque of Yazd was founded in the twelfth century; however, what stands on the site today is the new mosque (masjid-i jadid) built in 1324 under the Il Khanids, and later augmented in 1365 under the Muzaffarids. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries the mosque underwent further developments that added to its medieval nucleus. These multiple historical layers are most evident in the courtyard: to the east are the ruins of an early, pre-Saljuk mosque; to the south are fourteenth-century structures, and to the west are late eighteenth and nineteenth-century additions.According to Tarikh-i-jedid-i-Yazd (“The New History of Yazd”),

written in 1323 CE by Ahmad ibn Husayn ibn ‘Ali al-Kateb, the site adjacent to the earlier mosque was acquired by Sayyed Rukn ad-din Muhammad, who ordered the construction of an iwan with upper galleries, a domed chamber, and halls for prayer. Despite his death in 1330, work continued until the iwan and its galleries were completed. Three important aspects distinguish the Friday mosque of Yazd: its structural innovation, its remarkable decoration, and its being the “earliest” mosque upon which later fifteenth-century mosques in the Yazd region were modeled. 

The court surrounded on all four sides by one-story arcades of pointed-arch vaults resting on massive square piers. The complex’s main portal iwan is located on the east side of the court; the domed chamber (12 by 12 meters) with the main iwan preceding it occupies the center of the southern side of the court. The iwan has galleries on the second level. These permit access to the arcades’ roofs, enabling circumnavigation of the complex. Two rectangular “winter” prayer halls flank the domed chamber and extend halfway along the western and eastern arcades’ walls. The area of the building which includes the domed chamber and the two winter halls measures 46 by 54 meters; the courtyard including the bays of arcades measures 27 by 54 meters.

Water Museum

The Iranians have been using underground channels called “Qanat” for two thousand years to transport drinking water and irrigation water. To build a Qanat, you first need to find an underground water source. This is about 100 meters below the floor. You need to make tunnels that are very slightly inclined and sometimes traveling a long way in order to get the water upwards by itself. You can see the original state of Qanat structure passing through the city center. When you start to descend down the stairs from the entrance of the museum, you will feel that the dry air above has left its place in a humid air and the environment is starting to cool off. The original Qanat in the museum is about 50 meters deep. In addition, information such as tools used in Qanat construction, maps showing old Qanat roads, were exhibited at the entrance of the museum. It is estimated that a total of 50 thousand Qanat structures are found in Iran.

Sahib-i Zaman Zurhanesi

This Zurhanen, with a chance to be in the center of Yazd, has a great interest in the evening exercises. Often, foreign tour groups fill in the circles of Zurhanen, arranged in a circle, to watch the shows made twice at 18.30 and 20.00 each evening. Someone who finds us in Isfahan, who has a chance to see the prisoners who have stayed in the neighborhood and maintain their authentic character, will soon realize that the training there is a show / demonstration. A huge digital clock in front of the players on the trail was set up to keep track of when the shows would end, but in such an authentic setting, such a big digital indicator certainly does not fit here.After the show, you can go down a little steep stairs to see a quarry that passes under Zurhanne